About Andrea Malcomb

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So far Andrea Malcomb has created 30 blog entries.

A Lady Explorer, A Traveler in Skirts

2020-09-14T11:32:09-06:00

“A lady explorer?  A traveler in skirts? The notion’s just a trifle too seraphic: Let them stay and mind the babies Or hem our ragged shirts; But they mustn’t, can’t and shan’t be geographic." Letter to the Royal Geographic Society, June 1893 Who was the Intrepid Woman Traveler? By the 19th century, a new class [...]

A Lady Explorer, A Traveler in Skirts2020-09-14T11:32:09-06:00

Land of the Free and Home of the Brave, But Who Can Vote?

2020-08-24T13:21:47-06:00

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.- The 19th Amendment Alice Paul celebrates Tennessee's ratification of the 19th Amendment. The passage of the 19th amendment in 1920 was a seminal moment for [...]

Land of the Free and Home of the Brave, But Who Can Vote?2020-08-24T13:21:47-06:00

CO Artifact Highlight: Fireplace Screen

2020-08-15T11:10:58-06:00

When Historic Denver, Inc. bought the Molly Brown House in 1970, it had been emptied of Brown-owned objects and was being used as a boarding house. With restoration efforts and donations from descendants, Margaret’s renters, donors and others who had bought the objects in the house, museum curators have been able to verify and replace [...]

CO Artifact Highlight: Fireplace Screen2020-08-15T11:10:58-06:00

The Antis

2020-08-14T09:42:52-06:00

Like any progressive reform movement, the women’s suffrage movement was met with opposition from both men and women who believed that it would destroy the traditional order of the family. While many people, both men and women, were avid supporters of the movement to give women the vote, there was a very large movement against [...]

The Antis2020-08-14T09:42:52-06:00

“No Pink Tea”: Mrs. Brown for Senate

2020-07-30T11:55:49-06:00

In Margaret Brown’s era, “Pink tea politics” suggested a frivolous engagement with political change, particularly among women of the upper classes of society. Progressive-era gatherings known as ‘pink teas’  were a socially acceptable way for women to organize and strategize in the pursuit of women’s rights, particularly the right to vote without the oversight or [...]

“No Pink Tea”: Mrs. Brown for Senate2020-07-30T11:55:49-06:00

Readily Achievable: Historic Properties and the ADA

2020-07-30T09:36:10-06:00

Sunday, July 26, 2020 marked the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This landmark civil rights law prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities “in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public.”[1] The ADA added to previous disability [...]

Readily Achievable: Historic Properties and the ADA2020-07-30T09:36:10-06:00

Upstairs, Downstairs: Servants in Colorado and 1340 Pennsylvania St.

2020-07-02T15:10:49-06:00

“Servants of Mrs. Brown Poisoned”, reads a headline on page one of the May 7, 1904 edition of the Denver Times. “Five of the servants seriously ill from eating contaminated food but the family escaped any issues,” it continues. Sam Gleason, stable boy, Mary O’Fallon, cook, Annie Schleining, second girl, Sadie Johnson second girl, and [...]

Upstairs, Downstairs: Servants in Colorado and 1340 Pennsylvania St.2020-07-02T15:10:49-06:00

The History Behind Historic Denver

2020-06-24T16:03:45-06:00

Early Aerial of Denver, courtesy of Denver Public Library “A people’s memory is called history; and as a man without a memory, so a people without a history cannot grow wiser, better”. – Isaac Leib Peretz (Polish Author & Playwright) What exactly is historic preservation?  In these polarizing times, the term has almost taken on [...]

The History Behind Historic Denver2020-06-24T16:03:45-06:00

Halfway House in the House of Lions

2020-06-11T09:28:22-06:00

Throughout its existence, the Brown’s home, which has come to be known as the House of Lions, has had many different lives. After Margaret Brown died in 1932, the house and everything in it was sold in an estate sale. The house became apartments and, later, a boarding house. By 1952, it was under the [...]

Halfway House in the House of Lions2020-06-11T09:28:22-06:00

Helen Tobin Kosure Through the Eyes of Her Scrapbook

2020-06-10T10:55:35-06:00

When asked what kind of Senator she would make, Margaret Brown dealt a “crushing blow to the anti-suffragists who solemnly maintain that the vote will break up homes and spoil women as wives and mothers” when she proclaimed herself a mother of fourteen. She explained that she not only mothered her own children, but twelve [...]

Helen Tobin Kosure Through the Eyes of Her Scrapbook2020-06-10T10:55:35-06:00
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