How the Brown’s Spent Thanksgiving

2020-11-24T15:46:00-07:00

Giving thanks for a special event, for home and for family has a long tradition in the cultures across the world, but the American idea and tradition of Thanksgiving Day for Margaret Brown’s family and for many of us has evolved from simple proclamations of thanksgiving to God to an event centered around the home, [...]

How the Brown’s Spent Thanksgiving2020-11-24T15:46:00-07:00

A Lady Explorer, A Traveler in Skirts

2020-09-14T11:32:09-06:00

“A lady explorer?  A traveler in skirts? The notion’s just a trifle too seraphic: Let them stay and mind the babies Or hem our ragged shirts; But they mustn’t, can’t and shan’t be geographic." Letter to the Royal Geographic Society, June 1893 Who was the Intrepid Woman Traveler? By the 19th century, a new class [...]

A Lady Explorer, A Traveler in Skirts2020-09-14T11:32:09-06:00

“No Pink Tea”: Mrs. Brown for Senate

2020-07-30T11:55:49-06:00

In Margaret Brown’s era, “Pink tea politics” suggested a frivolous engagement with political change, particularly among women of the upper classes of society. Progressive-era gatherings known as ‘pink teas’  were a socially acceptable way for women to organize and strategize in the pursuit of women’s rights, particularly the right to vote without the oversight or [...]

“No Pink Tea”: Mrs. Brown for Senate2020-07-30T11:55:49-06:00

Upstairs, Downstairs: Servants in Colorado and 1340 Pennsylvania St.

2020-07-02T15:10:49-06:00

“Servants of Mrs. Brown Poisoned”, reads a headline on page one of the May 7, 1904 edition of the Denver Times. “Five of the servants seriously ill from eating contaminated food but the family escaped any issues,” it continues. Sam Gleason, stable boy, Mary O’Fallon, cook, Annie Schleining, second girl, Sadie Johnson second girl, and [...]

Upstairs, Downstairs: Servants in Colorado and 1340 Pennsylvania St.2020-07-02T15:10:49-06:00

Helen Tobin Kosure Through the Eyes of Her Scrapbook

2020-06-10T10:55:35-06:00

When asked what kind of Senator she would make, Margaret Brown dealt a “crushing blow to the anti-suffragists who solemnly maintain that the vote will break up homes and spoil women as wives and mothers” when she proclaimed herself a mother of fourteen. She explained that she not only mothered her own children, but twelve [...]

Helen Tobin Kosure Through the Eyes of Her Scrapbook2020-06-10T10:55:35-06:00

Margaret Brown and the Denver Women’s Press Club

2020-06-14T10:29:22-06:00

One of our wonderful volunteers recently won the Denver Women's Press Club's Unknown Writers Contest for Non-Fiction. She graciously agreed to write a guest blog for us on Margaret Brown and her involvement in the Press Club. We are happy to present it below: __________ The late 1800's marked a sea change for the women's [...]

Margaret Brown and the Denver Women’s Press Club2020-06-14T10:29:22-06:00

Suffrage Abroad

2020-03-02T10:56:49-07:00

“An Iraqi woman prepares to cast her voting ballot” courtesy of Wikimedia Commons  In the United States, the fight for women’s suffrage began in 1848 at a meeting in Seneca Falls, New York.[1] In 1869, Wyoming became the first territory to grant women the right to vote and in 1893, Colorado became the first state [...]

Suffrage Abroad2020-03-02T10:56:49-07:00

Getting to Know the Browns in Their Own Words

2020-02-06T14:47:43-07:00

The Museum recently began the undertaking of compiling all of Margaret and J.J. Brown's quotes. Along the way, we asked one of our Museum Specialists to write about the project and here is what she had to say: For the past few months I have been chipping away at what feels like an insurmountable task. [...]

Getting to Know the Browns in Their Own Words2020-02-06T14:47:43-07:00
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